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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Ted Poe
U.S. Representative, R-Texas
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Poe: The N.S.A. has always shown they will always interpret the law to the extent that allows them to seize the information. That's why the law has to be much more clear to the N.S.A. We all must remember that the N.S.A. was violating the Patriot Act as written. This amendment does something that is very concrete. It tells the N.S.A., get a warrant. Get a warrant through the front door, you get a warrant through the back door, you can't spy on Americans, unless you get a warrant. And that's what this legislation or this amendment does. I support this amendment.
Thomas Massie
Representative (R-KY)
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Massie: allow us to do, to keep American people safe while protecting their civil liberties. There are two provisions here and they both close back doors. One backdoor allows -- currently allows without probable cause or a warrant for the N.S.A. to query a database of American persons' information. This is wrong. They should have a warrant. The other part of this amendment would prevent money from being spent to fund companies to put back doors into products. When we -- when the government causes these companies to intentionally make defects in their products, they make Americans less safe. They make Americans' data less safe. And they compromise the quality of American goods overseas. But ultimately this is about the constitution. If you believe in the constitution.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Goodlatte: The bill passed by this house honors the fourth amendment and protects the rights of American citizens. At the same time, Islamic radical terrorists are on the march in Iraq and the leader has publicly threatened to attack America. Syria has become a vortex of jihaddists from across the globe and the Director of National Intelligence and the Director of Homeland Security have warned of the growing threat these jihaddists pose to our own homeland. State control has collapsed in Libya and rival gangs of radical terrorists have established safe havens that rival those in Afghanistan prior to 2001. Meanwhile in Afghanistan, the Taliban, Haqqani network, and al qaeda continue to fight. Moreover the administration has released the Taliban, five from Guantanamo, emboldening the terrorists. The terrorist danger is grave and growing. The terrorist threat is not contained overseas.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Goodlatte: The U.S. homeland remains a prime aspiration and target. This amendment would create a blind spot for the intelligence community tracking terrorists with direct connections to the U.S. homeland. This amendment would impose greater restrictions on the intelligence community's ability to protect national security than constitutionally required and create an impediment to the government's ability to locate threat information already in its possession. Such an impediment would put American lives at risk of another terrorist attack. I urge my colleagues to reject this amendment, stand by the legislation passed, it is also being considered in the senate, and there will be further negotiations, but this, this contradicts the intent of the house and endangers America's national security.
Virginia Foxx
Representative (R-NC), Judiciary Committee Chair
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Foxx: On this vote, the yeas are 293, the nays are 123, with one answering present. The amendment is adopted.
Heather Childers
Co-Anchor of America's News Headquarters and Co-Host of Fox and Friends
FOXNEWSW 06/20/2014
Childers: A surprise vote late last night to move this country one step closer to banning the N.S.A. from spying on you. The House passed an amendment blocking the agency from searching through your phones, your computers, all of that without warrant. The legislation also bans the N.S.A. and the C.I.A. from forcing manufacturers to install backdoor programs allowing easier access to technology. It now heads to the Senate.
Bill Scanlan
Producer/Host at CSPAN
CSPAN 06/25/2014
Scanlan: In another court ruling, the court ruled unanimously that police generally may not search the cell phones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants. Cell phones are unlike anything else police may find on someone they may arrest. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court, that they are not just another technological convenience, but ubiquitous increasingly powerful computers that contain vast quantities of personal sensitive information. He said with all that they contain, cell phones, with all they contain, they may reveal that they hold for many Americans the privacies of life so the message to police about what they should do before rummaging through a cell phone's contents following an arrest is simple, according to Judge Robert -- Justice Roberts, get warrant. That from the Supreme Court. A ruling today from the Supreme Court.
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Pete Williams: Writing for a strikingly unanimous court, Chief Justice Roberts said many of the more than 90% of the American adults who have a cell phone keep on their person a digital record of nearly every aspect of theirs lives, from the mundane to the intimate. To search one, the court said, police must get a warrant unless there's a genuine emergency. A huge victory for advocates of privacy in the digital age. Shapiro: Just because the police pull you over for speeding, doesn’t mean they should have access to your entire life. Your medical records, your bank records, your photo albums, everything about your life that people now carry around with them in their phone.
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Pete Williams: The nation's police arrest 13 million people every year, mostly for minor offenses. And for a century the courts have said police can search people they arrest to look for weapons and evidence of a crime. But today's ruling said cell phones are vastly different. Pete Williams: But today's ruling said cell phones are vastly different. They contain so much the court said, that searching one would typically reveal far more than even searching someone’s house. For example, it said the phrase, “there's an app for that, “ is now part of the language. And that apps a person selects can reveal everything from political affiliation to pregnancy. The justices said today's decision will have an impact on police because phones can reveal whether someone was selling drugs or even speeding or texting while driving. But the court said, privacy comes at a cost.
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Tom Goldstein, Supreme Court Expert: This is the first privacy decision of the digital era. It was almost a shock, the breadth with which the justices were willing to protect private information on computers and cell phones on the internet.
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